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20121201
20121231
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the state department released a review of the attack on the u.s. consulate benghazi and found, could come systemic failures and leadership management deficiencies. just after the report was released, as to state departments testified about the attack before the house foreign affairs committee. [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] the committee will come to order. after recognizing myself and the ranking member for seven minutes each for our opening statement we will then hear from our witnesses, deputy secretary william burns and deputy secretary tom, no strangers to what is we can allow the members to question our witnesses correctly as soon as possible we will forgo additional billing statements and instead i will recognize each member for six minutes following the presentation by the witnesses fought secretary clinton was scheduled to be here today but we have had to reschedule if her parents do to the unfortunate injury for which we wish her a speedy and healthy recovery. she has a confirmed once again she has every intention of testifying before our committee by mid ja
of the benghazi events, every member of this committee has shared with the president and secretary clinton our determination to get all the facts about what happened and why in benghazi. we submitted many questions to the state department to be incorporated into this investigation, and we're very pleased that they have been. we've had a number of classified briefings for our members, and yesterday, the committee heard from ambassador tom pickerring and admiral mike mulling, -- mullen. they were frank, and they are two of america's most distinguished and capable public servants. ambassador pickering served as under secretary to the state department and ambassador to india, russia, israel, and other important nations. admiral mullen, as we know, chairman of the joint chiefs of staff. i think that their backgrounds, their service to the country showed up starkly in the quality of the boards report, and i want to thank them for their extraordinary service to our country and i want to thank secretary clinton who appointed them, who selected them. the report pulls no punches. it tackles head on many
by the presidential debate and the whole issue of what happened in benghazi on september 11th, what i call the myth of libya's ire -- ire veal -- irrelevance of u.s. policy. go back to the libyan's fate, one, the u.s. relations with lip ya has been, you know, u.s. has always looked at libya as something of a strange creature that we could use for certain -- as a piece, of a strategy that had to do with the region as a whole. it was never looked at -- it was never seen as an object in and of itself. could start with the relation of the soviets, the eisenhower doctrine, and the united states' desire to push back soviet influence. libya was desperately pleading for u.s. attention back then, for aid, to get itself together, to stand on its own feet. this was before the discovery of oil, and the u.s. took a, well, you know, you're not really important as e just a minute, for example, and, you know, we'll think about it, and the result was that the prime minister of the time, you know, basically devised a plan to court the soviets and see if he could grab the united states' attention, and that happened.
in benghazi, where the u.s. ambassador three other americans were killed it at 8:00 a.m. eastern, the senate foreign relations committee will you from deputy secretary of state, william burns. more of that on c-span 2. >> up next, the foreign senate relations committee and authors of the state department report on september 11 attacks in the u.s. consulate benghazi, libya. that is followed by senator barbara boxer in two gun-control measures she plans to introduce. after that, represented diana decant and carolyn mccarthy touched by a booster in gun laws. >> our first experience was to come in a different way from other families out there. probably will never happen in history. we went in and took a picture he was behind the desk and not that we didn't get to move into the white house because he so unexpectedly left their daughter's then son-in-law to pack all of their clothes and belongings. it literally took seven or eight days. we had to go back to our little house in alexandria, virginia in suburbia, you know, the neighborhoods around the base euchre service. we been living there. his da
mullen and thomas pickering spoke about the report they offered on september 11 attack in benghazi, libya to cut u.s. ambassador christina and three other americans. the report cited systemic failures, leadership and management efficiencies and inadequate security at the conflict facility. three state department officials including eric boswell, assistant secretary of state in diplomatic security have resigned in the wake of the report. next, senators on the foreign relations committee who received the report speak to reporters. how not [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible] >> my understanding is that the standard with which the accountability board looks at people is a very high standard called breach of duty. but there's no question that there were people within the state department that were missed and did not execute in an appropriate way. there is also some cultural issues and i mean, there were no doubt a number of problems. i would just say to that end, i know that secretary clinton was unable to be able to testify in an open setting. i do think it's imper
the truth is, across eastern libya for many months before the attack took place in benghazi, there was a troubling pattern of deteriorating security. not all of it was directed at the united states, but there has been a tendency, not just in case of eastern libya but i think across the world in recent years for us to focus too much on specific credible threat. and sometimes lose the forest through the trees. i think that's something that we were painfully reminded of in the case of the benghazi attack, and we need to do better at. there's some specific recommendations the accountability review board has made that we will implement relentlessly in the state department. we will certainly work with the rest of the intelligence community. >> finally, reading from the report again and having listened to both ambassador pickering and admiral mullen's, where they made it very clear that while there are many mistakes that were made, the outline and respond to do, that significant problem here is resources. we can either head in the sand or we can ultimately meet that challenge. wher
'm speaking about is not good news because it deals with the tragic events that occurred in benghazi, libya, on september 11 when terrorists took the lives of our ambassador chris stevens and three other brave americans who were serving us there. mr. president, i rise today along with the ranking member of the homeland security and governmental affairs committee, senator collins, to submit for the record the report that she and i have been working on with our staffs and other members of the committee following those events in libya. we called this report flashing red, a specialist report on the terrorist attack in benghazi. flashing red was a term that was used in conversation with us by an official of the state department, and it couldn't have been more correct. all the evidence was flashing red that we had put american personnel in benghazi in an increasingly dangerous situation with violent is slammist -- violent islamicist extremists having occurred there with attacks on our mission there, two others prior to that year, and yet we did not give them the security that they needed to prote
>> for state department officials resigned after reports for lack of security at the u.s. benghazi, libya. wittiest ambassador and three other americans were killed. at 8 a.m. eastern the senate foreign relations committee, we will have that on c-span2. later in the day, we will head over to the house side of the capitol. we have live coverage at 1 p.m. eastern here on c-span3. >> our first experience was to come in a different way than every of them appear, probably will never happen again in history. it's interesting because after dad was sworn in we went in and took a picture, photo of the family behind the oval office desk, and that night we didn't get to move into the white house because nixon had left so quickly, so unexpectedly, they left their daughter and son-in-law, david eisenhower, to pack all their clothes and belongings. literally took seven or eight days. we had to go back to our little house in alexander virginia, suburbia, munich, the neighborhood was surrounded by secret service. we been living there. dad was vice president. i've never forget that night mom was co
by the presidential debate in the whole issue of what happened in benghazi which is the myth of bolivia's irrelevance to u.s. policy. over the course of, if you go back to the foundations of the libyan state in 1951, you know, the u.s. relations with libya have been -- the u.s. has looked at libya as something of an a strange creature that we could use for certain -- as a piece of the strategy that had to do with the region as a whole, but was never really looked at as -- the relationship was never seen as an object in and of itself. you could start off with their relationship with the soviets, the eisenhower doctrine and the united states to siring to push back soviet influence. libya was desperately pleading for u.s. attention back in, for eight tickets of to get to the list and on its own feet. this was before the discovery of oil. the u.s. kind of took, welcome here not as important as egypt, for example. we will think about that. the result was that the prime minister at the time basically devised the plan to court the soviets and see if he can grab the attention. the next major event was libyas
the compound connaughton if benghazi and i mean that seriously but it turned out not to be necessary. and if -- i didn't spend all that much time there because a lot of the reporting that i pass through and it is shifted to a different location, but they have maintained a bureau with armored cars and full-time iraqi staff. it was a fairly expensive endeavor for the newspaper. >> is life for any americans still in iraq still glass walls and armored cars? >> it is a group that is there not this last summer but the saudi the customer before and i went around in the street with all of the iraqis went to a demonstration, went to a store i wouldn't linger in the contested neighborhoods if you went into sadr city and some security it was a million times better than it was in 06 and 07 and i have to say from a military perspective the surge did strike down level violence and it's the surge that made it possible for the forces to leave the there are a very unsettled political issues including the worrisome trend by the iraqi government. >> the inside story of the struggle from iraq to george
the attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi said he gave three directives. find out who did this so we can bring them to justice. in secretary's letter she states, quote, we continue to hunt terrorists responsible for the attacks in benghazi and determined to bring them to justice. have you determined those responsible for the death of the brave americans and the destruction of the u.s. facilities? >> senator barrasso, just to restate, we are absolutely committed to bring those responsible to justice. we are absolutely committed to bringing every resource to the u.s. government to bear to accomplish that. we are pursuing this through a number of different channels. some of which can be discussed in other settings, but as you know, the fbi is leading the investigation, the state department is actively supporting this. i've been in libya to talk to the libyan leadership to talk about the importance of their cooperation and the investigation. i think we are making some progress. our char on the ground works every day in support of the fbi. i was in tunisia last week to emphasize to the presid
, the benghazi attacks? >> the benghazi attacks, you know, i know there are -- i believe there will be a report coming out tomorrow by the pickering group that will obviously present their view of what took place and where the problems were. my sense is that on that day, that when you look at what took place in benghazi, that it is, you know, as always with these kinds of situations, there is a mix here, but clearly with regards to one of the facilities involved, a direct attack on the facility. i think that there's no question that extremists were involved in those attacks, and i think that we are able to try to respond as best we could at the time. we've learned a lot and we will continue to learn a lot from that incident. i think it's very important for us in an area where people can be exposed to that kind of threat, that would be able to respond and respond quickly in order to make sure that that doesn't happen again. >> have you seen the benghazi arb? and do you support the referral of mike vickers for criminal prosecution on basis of leaking classified info to "zero dark thirty" producer
chris stevens and three others in tripoli on -- benghazi on september 11th. weak -- especially civil strife create exactly the kind of environment that terrorist are drawn to. libya's provided one such case where extremist can cause real problems for states undergoing difficult transitions to the democracy. another example is syria. there al qaeda in iraq seeks to establish a long-term dream. by fighting alongside the syrian opposition groups the members are working to hijack the longer struggle to suit their own extremist needs. last week we designated on the front of the ail yes, sir of aca i which is already listed as a foreign terrorist terrorist organization. as they try to wrap themselves in the legitimate sei of the we called it a warning to support the opposition to the syrian people and not help the terrorist group. to add to the list of new challenges, in west africa the loosely organized of collection of factions who have some ties to -- public sympathy. the number in sophistication to the attacks increasing and while the group focusing principally on local nigeria issues
that. that is kind of cool. language like i said before, things like ford did in benghazi, that has been completely released by the language of tolerance through political crack this. smoking is the last bastion of intolerance for a lot of people. they see me as a cigarette -- when they are drunk. can i have a cigarette? shut up. a lot of this is done through what i call the tyranny of cool. cool trumps all. we live in a culture where everyone wants to be cool. it's important to be accepted. how did this happen? the fact is, i use the phrase teenagers to describe everybody because that is what we have. they are upset with media pop-culture. people and in the entertainment and academic world are also obsessed with being cool. cool says traditional success is bad. it's an attack on their parents. enjoys comes back to something about dad did not hug me enough. i don't want to be like him and it's a total rebellion where people become relative. cool makes it so that it's all right. nobody, if you ask an actor who they would rather play, charles manson or mitt romney, they would say char
are seeing with susan rice in benghazi where people live saying, okay, she might have done it, but it is not important so how do we prioritize information to make sure that we are seeing the world correctly or events in the world correctly? it seems like that is an issue that is relevant then and now. >> one piece of good news is that sense september 11th a lot of people have become very, very interested in the middle east, and they never were before. there were forced to become interested in the middle east. not long ago i asked professor lewis was born in 1916, very, very few people in the west when he was. did you ever think that your field would become so important there would be such interest in
that sort of stuff. i think it was better defended than the american diplomatic compound in benghazi and i mean that seriously. it turned out not to be necessary but i mean i didn't spend all that much time there because i did a lot of embedded reporting. they shifted it to a different location but you know, they had a bureau there with armored cars, full-time iraqi staff. it was a fairly large endeavor for the newspaper. >> are there any americans in iraq with armored cars? >> it has improved. i was there the summer before to see prime minister melekian i went around in the street with iraqis, got out of the car and went to a demonstration went to a store. i wouldn't linger in some of the more contested neighborhoods. if you went into sadr city you would make sure you have security. it is better than it was by far, it's a million times better than it was an six and a seven and i have to say from a military perspective, the search really did drive down the level of violence. it was the surgeon made possible for american forces to leave but there are very unsettled political issues includin
're actually not as nimble as they need to be. i look at benghazi and answers questions about the talking points, but the bigger policy deployed when he set up is how do we influence the next faith? ambassador chris stevens who is killed to honor his memory. redeemer people speaking arabic to understand the types of different political forces we could work with and as we actually need to kill. right now the washington debate isn't about that. it's a little intellectual, narrow in focus, getting the facts straight is important. but were not well poised on egypt and other countries in the region and collectively to have the role in shaping it. >> felix must thought from daily paper. >> thank you, gentlemen. and they said very much enjoy the cultural debate. i hesitantly stepped into the family feud. if i can make two very quick points. what i thought was missing, especially deadly to your firm broth and brett perhaps is this path leads us down a road that would not be to democracy. but what is the alternative path? research to try to run a dictatorship and aligning the united states the tyr
on facilities in benghazi and extreme violence elsewhere in the region began to change that and these governments increasingly show political will to tackle the terrorists are. in many cases they lack the resources and expertise to handle this complex and difficult challenge. this is a unique opportunity for the international community to help the capacity of these nations, which are eager and willing to take on terrorism. this task comes with great urgency. we must address it now before the threat, which is pretty durable becomes more serious. some of these governments have doubts about u.s. counterterrorism object is presented to implicate us and ask kerry to buy from a machine security services. will have to work through those ideas and in fact we can agree with these new governments that are rerun of predecessors regimes is not what we seek norwood is needed. on the contrary, that there's numerous factors that feed into the phenomenon of radicalization countermeasures by security services were surely among the most potent. the goal of our counterterrorism must remov
in the department's security review after the benghazi attack making additional funds available for this purpose is one of the recommendations of the accountable -- accountability review board chaired by ambassador pickerring and admiral mullen. this amendment is a permissive amendment. it is not a prescriptive amendment. it permits the transfer of funds between the diplomatic program and embassy security, construction and maintenance at which would otherwise be precluded due to percentage limitations on such transfers. according to c.b.o., the amendment has no outlay scoring impact. we all want to do -- we all want to do what we can to prevent another tragedy like what occurred in benghazi. the state department has done a review and these funds will be used to expedite construction of marine security guard posts overseas posts to, build secure embassies in beirut, lebanon and zimbabwe. there is nothing controversial about this amendment. these are existing funds. there is no new appropriation. this amendment has no scoring impact. it's simply a matter of allowing unobligated prior-year funds to
diplomatic compound in benghazi but it turned out not to be necessary. i didn't spend that much time because i did a lot of imbedded reporting but i passed through and they shifted to a different location. they maintain a bureau there with armored cars, full time iraqi staff, it was a fairly expensive endeavor for the newspaper. >> host: is life for any americans still in iraq still glass walls and armored cars? >> guest: it has improved. i was there not last summer but the summer before to see prime minister maliki and i went around in the streets with all iraqis, walked around, went to a demonstration, went to a store. i wouldn't linger in the more contested neighborhoods. if you went into solder city would make sure you have security. is better than it was, a million times better than in 2006-2007 and from the military perspective the surge did drive down the level of violence. it made it possible for american forces to leave but there are a lot of very unsettled political issues including a worrisome trend towards authoritarianism by the iraqi government. >> host: michael gordon's new bo
intelligence capabilities. we sometimes screw that up as the case of benghazi demonstrates the biggest policy question which i hope we debate is how we become more nimble and understand the political trends. thanks. [applause] thank you very much. bret coming you are up. first of all entry honored to be here and particularly honored to be on the panel introduced by jim i have the greatest admiration for and to be with this mostly distinguished panel. [laughter] the exception of course is reuel. the austrian physicist used to put down his worst students by saying you're not even wrong. [laughter] that's why i am inclined to take the comments. you know, if i say to my son what is five plus seven and he says 11, that's wrong. if he says banana then he's not even wrong. what you have heard from reuel especially is a banana. what would he has just essentially done in a very slippery and disingenuous way is to say that the choice that we face is between secular dictatorship in the strike or various others and democracy we have to accept this democracy because even if it is an islamist democracy if
communication failures in the fort hood terrorism case, and our current scrutiny of the attacks in benghazi, joe lieberman has always put country first. his actions are guided by deeply held principles and aimed toward progress. he has demonstrated his willingness time and again to risk his political career to do what he believes is right for america. joe brings the same dedication to everything he does. working with him on the armed services committee, i know firsthand how devoted he is to our men and women in uniform, and the deep respect he has for their service and their sacrifice. his leadership in bringing about the repeal of the discriminatory don't ask, don't tell law was nothing short of extraordinary, and it gives me great personal pride to have assisted him in achieving that important victory for justice. and it was vintage joe lieberman. he did what was right. he never gave up. and he got the job done. throughout his many years of dedicated service, joe has demonstrated the kind of character that america needs and that the american people deserve. it is not by coincidence that the po
watched al-qaeda elements able to destroy our or damage severely our consulate in benghazi and kill four brave americans. the message has to be sent that the united states is engaged, reeled disability claims to be involved, and the united states is ready to do whatever is necessary to prevent and act that could endanger or take the lives of literally thousands and thousands of innocent people. senator lieberman. >> thanks, john. we've obviously reached a grave moment in the war that's raged in syria now for more than 20 months, and it's grave for the obvious effect that we believe the outside government has weaponnized the chemical and bilogical agents and put them in a position where they can be used fairly rapidly. this, as you look back over the 20 months of the conflict, this follows a series of events, one leading to the other which people said could not happen, and this began, remember, with peaceful demonstrations, and when assad was unable to control them or suppress them, he began to fire on his own people, and they began to defend themselves in a very unfair fight, one many of
or kidnapped westerners in the region. given what happened in benghazi diaz evidence it happened in al qaeda and the not read that it was the attack on the u.s. consulate and ultimately the death of chris stevens? >> i think we can say that aqim played a role in the investigations are still under way precisely how aqim members interacted with others in the closed session. >> we will try to arrange that. >> on that same point, you acknowledged that the u.s. africa command is coordinating with equal loss while making planning for an intervention in the north. i guess that should be said of potential intervention in the north; is that correct? >> it is correct to say that the intervention is in the planning phases at this point. the intervention would be involved by the armed forces with support from the international military force. there is no contract or intention of having the u.s. boots on the ground type of support to that intervention. but at this point, we are fighting the planning support exclusively, and we will look at opportunities to provide training and equipping support to the pa
that community wasn't, and to the extent i talked about foreign policy, i was talking about benghazi rather than cuba. >> last question. you didn't use the word "immigration." it was not in there? >> it came up -- >> a little bit. >> a little bit. it came up in the following way. people wanted to know that the president cared about the issue. they wanted to understand why it hasn't be achieved in his first term. it served, almost in these interviews the same function i view it serving generally that of the threshold issue, and by that i mean, if you're okay on immigration, they listen to the rest of it. if you're not okay on immigration, they are not going to listen to the rest of it, which, i think, is part of, i don't think it's fully the problem republicans have, but it's part of it, receivers a little, again, in these antedoal evidence derived from interviews that it was an issue, but it was almost a you're okay on this issue, let's talk about the rest of it. >> fascinating, great. same question. what did you do on your autumn vacation? now, i know you organized an independent expenditure, s
in benghazi next week. secretary of state, hillary clinton, testified before the house florida affairs committee. we'll have that live on the c-span networks and c-span.org. here's a look at the prime time programming across the c-span networks. >> i've been on that bus. they are just as good as gold. >> all of us, i think, in the country were starting to people coming out and talking about their experience, this phenomena, that so many of us experienced in one way or another and had no words for other than adolescence, other than growing up. we're finally, people were starting to stand back and say, hold on, this is not a normal part of growing up. this is not a right of passage. there was a moment where there's a possibility for change, and director lee and i decided to start the film out of that feeling that voices were bubbling up, coming up to the surface to say that this is not something we can accept anymore as a normal part of the culture. >> the filmmaker lowen gathered essays and perm stories together in "bully," and hear more saturday night at 10 on "afterwords" and more boo
't -- and to the extent i was talking about foreign policy, i was talking about benghazi rather than cuba. >> last question, you didn't use the word immigration. immigration was not in that -- >> it came up a little, it came up -- >> a little bit. >> it came up a little bit, and it came up in the following way, um, people wanted to know that the president cared about the issue. they wanted to understand why it hadn't been achieved in his first term. um, it served almost in these interviews the same function that i view it serving generally, which is that of of a threshold issue. and by that i mean if you're okay on immigration, they'll listen to the rest of it. if you're not okay on immigration, they're not going to listen to the rest of of it. which i think is part of -- i don't think it's fully the problem republicans have right now with latinos, but it's part of. so it served a little bit, again, in this kind of anecdotal evidence derived from interviews that it was an issue, but it was almost a you're okay on this issue, let's talk about the rest of it. >> fascinating. great. okay, alfonso, sa
.s. embassy security and construction. after the whole benghazi thing that could be cut. >> guest: exactly. they're trying to put some of that money back into embassy security i just read. well i heard from the national association of, national parks conservation association that the sequestration cut for them would be the equivalent of shutting down 200 parks with about 9,000 seasonal employees laid off. that would be something people with notice when they go visit. >> host: so both sides are trying to come up with some sort of a compromise so they avoid all the cuts we just talked about. what do republicans want to do? >> guest: they have more emphasis on spending cuts than president obama and john boehner has come up with about $2.2 trillion plan over 10 years. he offered 800,000, i'm sorry, 800 billion in revenues, which he would like to get from tax reform, broadening the base, removing some of the tax deductions. without raising the income tax rates on the higher income households. and that is the sticking point. president obama has offered not real specific plan for spending cuts. i
a briefing of a new state department report on the benghazi consulate. >> ensure the safety of our fellow americans serving our nation overseas. it's a good start but it's only a start. a tragedy in benghazi raise a lot of other serious questions about our military, intelligence community, and perhaps most importantly, the administration so-called light footprint approach to libya and so many other challenges. they do not provide answers to these questions because it never asked them. it's essential defense department conducted similar independent and comprehensive accountability effort on the occasion of the worst terrorist attack in american history after repeated attacks on u.s. and western interests in benghazi. why were no, no, no. to assets or units posture, alert and ready to respond to what should've been a foreseeable contingency? one in which two of the four people who lost their lives were killed in the seventh hour of the attack. this raises larger questions that the defense department must consider. what greater role doing the our military to play in the defensive our diploma
Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)